Peachstone Gulch Trail

This is a great time of year to go hiking and the wildflowers will be spectacular this year! Here’s a great hike, from GetOffYourGass:


Peachstone Gulch Trail

(Western States Trail)                                                                          MAP

20 miles from Auburn Courthouse. Easy-steep 15 miles, one way.

If you enjoy hiking where you aren’t likely to see anyone except during the Western States run this is the place for you! This is one of the most remote sections of the entire trail and because it is more difficult to access, seldom used. With 15 miles of trail between Foresthill and Ford’s Bar you get great views of the Middle Fork Canyon with some easy walking stretches high above the river, but it does drop 2000 feet overall. Southern exposure means hot and dry in the summer but it also crosses some creeks that run wet all year. The trail can be reached as an extension of Driver’s Flat, from Foresthill, or from Todd Valley estates. You could also camp at Ford’s Bar and stay for days or, until State Park rangers notice you.

Directions: Go 20 miles from Auburn to Foresthill. The trail is accessed from California street or from Mosquito Ridge Road right out of town. Otherwise you can get on it closer to Ford’s Bar from Todd Valley estates using Nugget to Alton Road. Or my favorite, go to the end of Oakwood, park and take the trail south that winds around the ridge to drop in 8 miles from Foresthill.

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Satellite Reveals End of “Unending” N. California Drought


With more rain and snow on the way, the supposed “unending drought” that the New York Times reported on last year has, in a matter of weeks, ended — at least in Northern California.

Yesterday’s color satellite imagery from NASA shows the dramatic changes which have occurred since the same date three years ago:

NASA Aqua MODIS color satellite imagery of N. California separated by exactly three years, showing dramatic snowpack increase, vegetation greening, and river discharge into the Pacific Ocean.

– Widespread and deep snowpack
– Greening vegetation
– Rivers overflowing their banks
– Strong river discharge into the Pacific Ocean

Here’s a zoomed version of the NASA Terra MODIS image yesterday covering the San Francisco Bay area northeastward toward Sacramento:

NASA Terra MODIS zoomed image on 13 January 2017 covering San Francisco to Sacramento.

The latest GFS model forecast for the next 10 days predicts another 2 to 10 inches of rain, depending on location, with several more feet of snow at higher elevations.

Source: Satellite Reveals End of “Unending” N. California Drought « Roy Spencer, PhD

Wilderness Survival Guide: How To Stay Alive If Lost, Hurt or Stranded


How to survive when the SHTF

Surviving in the Wild

Ammo.com


Imagine a fun afternoon hike around Mt. Baker. You’re enjoying the quiet of the forest, the dappled light shining through the trees, and the intoxicating smell of the leaves when thick fog rolls in unexpectedly at 4:00 p.m. In a panic, you follow the wrong trail for hours along a progressively steeper face until you’ve run out of daylight.

Imagine being on a snowmobile in the back-country with friends, zipping through the powder and chasing each other between the tree trunks when a blizzard sets in and the last snowmobile doesn’t show up at the rendezvous point.

Or imagine the mountain biking trip you’ve been daydreaming about for months, bombing down the mountain with the wind in your face. You get separated from your group on a tricky portion of single-track, and decide to press on when you come to an unknown fork in the trail. Feeling exhausted and dehydrated, you take a corner too fast and crash, tacoing your front wheel and breaking your collar bone.

Lost, hurt, stranded – these scenarios and others like them play out over three thousand times per year in the United States. Folks heading outdoors in search of adventure don’t plan on getting lost or hurt in the wilderness. It can happen to the best of us, and when it does, people underestimate the challenges of the wilderness and overestimate their own ability.

To help you avoid becoming a statistic by rightly explaining the dangers of the wilderness and ensuring that you are physically and mentally prepared for any snags during your adventures, we’ve put together this wilderness survival guide.

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GetOffYourGass.com: The Ultimate Guide to Hiking on The Georgetown Divide


“Hikes from the North Fork to the South Fork of the American River”


 
With a brief respite from winter’s El Niño storms and temperatures nearing 70° across the Georgetown Divide, there couldn’t be a better time to get out and enjoy the great outdoors! While snow at higher elevations limits trail use to snowshoes or cross-country skis at this time of year, lower elevation trails are open and are often lightly used during the cooler months.

For local hikers, GetOffYourGass.com is the ultimate guide to hiking on the Georgetown Divide. GetOffYourGass was created in 2007 by Philip Liberman to provide a source on the web for hikes in the American River watersheds above Folsom Lake. “Get Off Your Gass” was the name Tom Petersen used when he lead hikes in the region during that time period.

The site contains more than 300 pages of hiking trails and detailed, hand-drawn maps. This is a collection of hikes from the books: Auburn Outback, Georgetown Hiking Trails, Lost Trails of the Sierra Nevada, Placerville Paths and Take a Hike! by local authors Tom Petersen, Robert J. Griffis and Evan W. Jones.

visit: GetOffYourGass

Georgetown’s 8th Annual Nature Fest Coming May 7th

Happy Easter to The Georgetown Divide

Of course, these beautiful flowers were found in “Bob’s” front yard!

photo thanks to: vntghippy

Legendary “Chupacabra” Shot By Georgetown Man

Chupacabra or a hairless bear?

To handyman Frank Gallo, the creature that almost attacked him beside his rural trailer several days ago looked like the legendary Chupacabra.

“Scared the hell out of me,” Gallo said. “It crouched and faced me and I shot two warning shots at it – 357-magnum, from 20-feet.”

The shots seemed to have no effect and Gallo kept firing during the encounter.

“He looked down at where he’d been shot and let out a cry that sounded like, maybe a six year old girl. Ahhhhhh, really loud,” Gallo said.

When Gallo saw the animal up close, it was even stranger.

Was this a legendary "Chupacabra" or a juvenile black bear with mange?

“If you could feel this thing, if you could touch it, it’s skin is like an elephant,” Gallo said.

The animal had huge claws, canine-like teeth and almost no fur on its body. However, it was the animal’s lack of fur that tipped off California Department of Fish and Game Warden Patrick Foy.

“(It’s) probably a juvenile bear and has developed some type of an ailment that’s caused it’s skin to shed all of it’s fur,” Foy said.

To Gallo, it looked more like, the supposedly, mythical creature known in Mexico as a Chupacabra.

Gallo scoured the Internet, looking for images and information on the Chupacabra.

“Something like this (animal) will hit an animal, knock it down, grab it and suck the blood out of it. That’s where the name Chupacabra comes from, it’s Spanish for goat-sucker,”Gallo said.

“Could be a fairly new species, you know. Could be a mutation,” Gallo said.

However the pictures told Foy it was more likely a bear. Late Tuesday evening, a game warden picked up the animal and confirmed Foy’s suspicions that it was a young bear.

It may take several days to determine what caused the bear to lose it’s fur.

“Somebody with an untrained eye would look at this and think that this was a pretty creepy-looking character,” Foy acknowledged.

Gallo is not convinced.

“Doesn’t move anything like a bear, didn’t act like a bear. Doesn’t make sounds like a bear,” Gallo said. “There are skeptics and there are people that are open-minded.”

via: News10.net

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